Arun @ 70mm :

Pyar Ke Side/ Effects (PKSE) may have ventured into a familiar territory that was explored earlier by Nagesh Kukunoor in Hyderabad Blues -1 & 2 but it still smells oven fresh. Cynics may want to write it off as a wannabe Hollywood movie or the one trying to wander in the lanes of Meet the Parents, but its infectious charm is undeniable. Its like an old story narrated in a refreshingly funny way, ofcourse with the occasional cliches, keeping the contemporary world in mind.

Rangan on Dor

As the film unfolds, you see that, just as with Iqbal, Kukunoor seems to do his best work while walking on the middle of the road – not pandering especially to either commercial or art-house considerations. The impression I got with Dor was that of watching something like Majid Majidi’s Baran filtered through a Bollywood-lite sensibility. Like Iranian cinema, this is a heartwarmingly simple story, simply told, but with dialogues and music and melodrama taken from our cinema.
[…]
This dialogue-baazi is all us, but the thunder and lightning dramatics that you would assume would follow is missing. And that’s wonderful because there are a lot of us who don’t want to give up entirely our moviemaking conventions, but would also like, at times, to see our films transcend them. We want it both ways, and like Hrishikesh Mukherjee before him, Kukunoor seems to have hit upon the golden mean.

Chitra about Dor

For the contrast in the reaction/ response of the protagonists to the obstacles in their lives…….

For the breath-taking cinematography capturing the colours of Rajasthan and the locales of Himachal Pradesh…..

Oz on Desi train makes a strong request to watch and encourage new movies which are different, fresh. Just like few of the sentences above, I strongly agree with his statements.

It’s time to sit up and recognize the struggles and efforts this first generation of Bollywood writers in the 21st century are going through, just to bring out positive, meaningful cinema – cinema they believe in, you believe in, I believe in.

Jaideep Sahni, Anurag Kashyap, Abbas Tyrewala, Sriram Raghavan, Imtiaz Ali, Jahnu Barua, Nagesh Kukunoor, Anurag Basu, Sandeep Shrivastav and a few others that I may have missed in this Gen 21 that make you jump off your seat and do a Balle Balle.

Yet this Gen 21 may quickly disappear into the fast setting sun, if you and I don’t accept our responsibility as an audience. The responsibility to go out and support such positive cinema, so the producers can recover their money, thereby fortifying their trust in such scripts, such stories, and such cinema.

The period between 1984 to 1995 must have been the worst in Bollywood, in terms of quality. Whereas in this year of 2006, in about 9 months, there are at least 5 movies that have just been amazing, in the period between 1984 to 1995 there must have been hardly 5 – 10 movies that you would have bothered to give a nod to.

And we may soon move to that moronic phase if you don’t get up, walk out and drive to the nearest theater that is showing Khosla ka Ghosla and such amazing movies (I hear Dor is masterpiece, though it hasn’t released here in Los Angeles) that emits nothing but pure sincerity and meaning. Movies that tell a good story.
[…]
Southern California is about one third the size of the Indian state of Maharashtra. And Khosla ka Ghosla (as far as I know) is running in just one theater in the entire region. On Saturday at the 1pm show, there was a huge crowd (Telugu) at the theater to watch a Telugu movie (some Nagarjuna or Chiranjeevi movie). The screen where the Telugu movie was being shown was completely packed.

I stepped into Screen number 3, where KKG was being shown. We were three people in the entire hall watching the movie. Three supporters of a good movie in an area one third the size of Maharashtra. Three people. Me. And two others who found it hard to get off their cell phones while watching the movie (if I had a baseball bat they both would have been in the hospital by now). So that left just one person, who seriously watched the entire movie. One. Me.
[…]
A Minus. No gimmicks. No million dollar sets. No lavish song and dance sequences. No over the top emotional vomit. No special effects. No Swiss or New Zealand scenes. It’s just a pure story. Pulled right out of your life and mine. Simply said, funnily told. Khosla ka Ghosla is the golden needle that hits your heart. Right at that sweet spot.

He goes on to review Khosla ka ghosla which I have resisted to read.(Will do after watching, if possible)

You know whats saddening, that I am sitting and compiling this post rather than run and watch them myself first hand. Dor runs one show at an unheard of awful show timing (for a single show) at 3:30PM and the other two nowhere to be seen. Suddenly I feel I am in a different planet.
I do not like this.

This year has really been good for Bollywood both in terms of quality and box-office (Krish,Kank,Fanaa,Omkara,RDB,LRM to name a few) and as Oz says

The period between 1984 to 1995 must have been the worst in Bollywood, in terms of quality. Whereas in this year of 2006, in about 9 months, there are at least 5 movies that have just been amazing, in the period between 1984 to 1995 there must have been hardly 5 – 10 movies that you would have bothered to give a nod to.